May 5, 2017

 

Re: Sequoia Roots Restoration Corp Introductory Letter and Objectives

 

WildPlaces introduces the Sequoia Roots Restoration Corp, a newly created habitat restoration Corp that creates jobs in the environmental sector and to increase habitat restoration on public lands. Employing 6-8 people of all ages, the Corp implements on-the-ground land and river conservation, stewardship and restoration projects in the southern Sierra Nevada in Tulare, Kern and Fresno Counties.  Recent catastrophic wildfires have impacted the Sierra’s diverse flora and fauna while causing sedimentation of rivers and streams resulting in decreased river water quality.

With unemployment amongst young adults in the southern San Joaquin Valley at over 20%, jobs are of paramount concern, without which youth will continue to drop out of school, join gangs, be incarcerated, and fall to the limitations of teen pregnancy. All of these metrics of poverty exist in the regions that WildPlaces’ serves. SRRC is not  full or part time positions for this first year.  

WildPlaces will create and then utilize this community-based planting and trail maintenance crew as an important part of its capacity development, youth empowerment and increased acres of habitat restored and miles of river repaired.  WildPlaces has engaged with Sequoia National Forest and the National Forest Foundation in the planning and funding of projects and training for the Sequoia Roots Restoration Corp (SRRC) that includes Wilderness Ranger Academy,  WildLeaders Training, and watershed education training for projects such as tree planting, trail repair and soil erosion management.

Jeffery, sugar, ponderosa pines, Giant sequoia, and incense cedar seedlings are to be planted in the thousands at the Cedar Fire Burn Area. As well, the outdoor experience of the SRRC working in the Sequoia National Forest will be enhanced through trail reconstruction in wildfire burn areas within two Giant sequoia groves where trails have been partially or completely destroyed or have been unmanaged for years. Three miles of destroyed trails are to be reconstructed in the Rough Fire Burn Area within the Monarch Wilderness and one half mile within the Long Meadow Giant sequoia grove at Trail of 100 Giants. We will be selecting 6-8 women and men to carry out these forest health and civic engagement goals plus one superevisor.

 Corp members and supervisor attend two paid trainings: WildLeaders training held in May to train SRRC and other volunteers in backcountry logistics, emergency response, risk management, and volunteer management and Wilderness Ranger Academy in June to learn skills in trail repair, tree planting, Wilderness ethic, and use of non-mechanized tools in designated Wilderness Areas; and  training in watershed basics TBD.

While natural processes play a major role in forest fire recovery, certain actions to protect California watersheds can be taken to speed the recovery of resource and recreation values by reducing sediment and soil erosion, re-establishing native plant species and seed trees, and repair recreation trails. Public understanding and active participation in these processes is fundamental for land managers to more successfully restore critical habitat on public lands and gain public buy-in to the valuable resources that public lands provide.

Returning resource connectivity through reconstruction of trails and drainage structures are vital to the function of public lands as a resource to the public, and represent places where both pristine nature as well as that in recovery from wildfire can be accessed, enjoyed and witnessed by citizens, whose firsthand experiences will educate and enhance understanding of the function of fire and the differences between natural, slow moving fires and destructive wildfires. Trail work is especially important in Wilderness Areas where this project will in part occur (Monarch

Wilderness) and where trails are the only access allowed. Reconstruction is important to the public as well as to resource manager, fire fighters, restoration crews, and the general public.

 

 

OBJECTIVES

  • Six selected as paid Corp members from May until September 2017 to carry our forest health and civic engagement goals.
  • Conduct WildLeaders Training held in May to train SRC and other volunteers in backcountry logistics, emergency response, risk analysis, and volunteer management.
  • Attend Wilderness Ranger Academy for further training in specific skills necessary for conducting work.
  • Training will inspire pride and confidence in Nature, leadership development, and teamwork.
  • Demonstrate career options in land management and advocacy
  • Restore ecosystem resiliency, structure, and diversity on northern Cedar Fire burn area within SFN/Giant Sequoia National Monument (GSNM) by reintroducing native vegetation
  • Restore 25-50 acres of wildfire-impacted area restored.
  • Plant 2500-3000 Native pine species over three events
  • Repair 2-3 miles of theKanawyer Trail which is in the Monarch Wilderness and was severely damaged in the Rough Fire burn. In addition, the Corp will repair trails on the Trail of 100 Giants.
  • Protect Giant Sequoia Grovesalong Kanawyer Trail and plant seedlings at the Belknap Grove.

 

 Sequoia Roots Restoration Corp Personnel

7 Members total

1 Supervisor: $22-25/ hour @ 30 hours/month for 3-4 months

6 Corps Member: $18-20/hour @  28 hours/month for 4 months

Selection of members will occur in April, training in May and June, and field work July-Septemberof 2017. This is the first and pilot year of the project and is intended to continue for at least 3 years. Corp members are encouraged to remain in the Corp for at least two years.

 

 

 

Sequoia Roots Restoration Corp Job Description

The purpose of the Sequoia Roots Restoration Corp is jobs creation in the environmental sector and increased habitat restoration on public lands. Employing 6-8 people of all ages for seasonal summer projects, the Corp implements on-the-ground land and river conservation, stewardship and restoration projects in the southern Sierra Nevada in Tulare, Kern and Fresno Counties.  Recent catastrophic wildfires have impacted the Sierra’s diverse flora and fauna while causing sedimentation of rivers and streams resulting in decreased river water quality. The Corp will remedy these effects through on-the-ground projects that restore and protect fire impacted areas as well as other habitat restoration opportunities.

These positions are particularly suited for those who are underemployed or even full time employed. There is room to adjust the number of days in the field down to occur on weekends only

Locations:

Cedar WildFire Burn Area that lies in the north portion of burn near Protugese Pass. Access is from Sugarloaf (seedlings)

Rough Wildfire Burn area that lies within Monarche Wilderness Hume Lake RD SQF. Access is from North gate Sequoia National Park then onto SQF. (Trails)

Belknap Grove located on Western Divide Hwy within Western Divide RD SQF (trails)

 Sequoia Roots  Restoration Corp

7 Members

1 Supervisor: $22-25/ hour @ 30- 33 hours/month for 4 months.

6         Corps Member: $18-20/hour @  28-30 hours/month for 4 months

 

Training Dates:

May 13-14 OR May 29-30– Basic Field Leaders Training, Springville, CA

June 5-9 Wilderness Ranger Academy

 

Work Dates:

 Either four  4-day fire recovery events or Six 2-day (weekend) fire recovery events. Dates Subject to Change to Corp Member scheduling needs)

May 20-21 – Cedar Fire                                                                 May 20 – 21 – Cedar Fire

June 3 - 4: Cedar Fire                                      OR                          June 3-4 – Cedar Fire

June 23- 26 : Rough Fire                                                                July 24 – 25  Rough Fire

July 28 – 31 : Rough Fire                                                          July 29 – 30 – Rough Fire

August 17- 19 Belknap Grove                                                    August 12 – 13 _ Rough Fire

                                                                                                     August 19 – 20 -  Belknap Grove

 

Required Skills:

·         Experience in a conservation Corp program (AmeriCorp, CCC, Sequoia Corp, Proteus, etc) or outdoor leadership program (NOLS, Wilderness Academy, BAWT, LAWT

·         Ability to work in a team. Good communication skills with desire to improve them

·         Physically able to hike at least 5-10 miles per day with gear. Those applicants who are ability different/physically limited may be considered also.

·         Basic radio skills

·         Ability to get to and from meeting and training locationsw. Some transport is available and should be coordinated by Corp member and supervisor.

·         Attend all trainings as indicated above

·         A commitment to safety and ability to follow field protocol and supervisor instruction.

·         Backpacking experience and a desire to be in the backcountry for up to five days at a time

·         Basic map skills and radio communication

·         At least 18 years of age

·         Ability to cook and live in the backcountry

·         (Supervisor) Two years of project management or as supervisor

·         US citizenship may not be required in case-by-case base

Desired Skills:

·         Blue Card or equivalent certification

·         LNT Training

·         First Responder Training

·         Bi-lingual

·         Wilderness Ranger Academy

 

·         CA Drivers licens

·          

 

Selection Process and Compensation:

7 Members total

1 Supervisor: $22-25/ hour @ 30 hours/month for 3-4 months

6 Corps Member: $18-20/hour @  28 hours/month for 4 months

Selection of members will occur in May and training in May and June. Field work July-August 2017. This is the first and pilot year of the project and is intended to continue for at least 3 years. Corp members are encouraged to remain in the Corp for at least two years.

Medical Insurance may be purchased through fiscal sponsor.

 

Sponsors:

Sequoia Roots Corp is made possible through competive grant awards from Rose Foundation, National Forest Foundation, National Wilderness Stewardship Alliance