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Long Meadow Restoration: Willow Planting


  • Long Meadow Group Campsite Co Rte 107 Porterville, CA, 93257 United States (map)


Long Meadow Willow Planting

Restoring the source of water in the Valley one tree at a time


When: Saturday, March 24, 2018 9:00 AM until
Sunday, March 25, 2018 3:00 PM
(optional overnight)
Where: Long Meadow Group Campsite in the Giant Sequoia National Monument near trail of 100 Giants.
Departure and Transport: Departure is from WildPlaces headquarters in Springville at 10 a.m. Space available in the WildPlaces van. Caravanning to the site is necessary due to locked gates.

 

What to Bring: Warm, layered clothes/hat/gloves, special dietary needs, flashlight, close-toed shoes/boots, rubber boots, musical instruments, tent/pad, cup/plate/water bottle/utensils. WildPlaces will provide vegetarian meals, snacks, beverages. WildPlaces provides tools and gloves and has gear to loan.

 

Project Background:
You are invited to help repair and protect high Sierra meadows, the source water of ALL water used in the Great Central Valley. The Ten Meadows Project located in two areas on the Giant Sequoia National Monument and Sequoia National Forest aims to protect impaired meadows, critical in ensuring adequate quality and quantity of water for Californians.
Restoring native vegetation is the fundamental way in which to do this. WildPlaces has collected willow cuttings and propagated 450 saplings for this project. Our WildPlaces Nursery in Springville, CA holds them currently and they are ready to plant.
This watershed improvement project across ten meadows in the headwaters of the North and South Forks of the Kern River plus Long Meadow in the Rattlesnake Watershed will improve the resiliency of montane meadows, riparian ecosystems, and watershed hydrologic processes.
V
olunteers are needed on the weekend of March 23-24 to begin the re-vegetation phase; that is, take the seedlings we have propagated in our nursery and plant them back into Long Meadow near Trail of 100 Giants so that meadow function can be restored.

Pre-event briefing is on 3/22 at 5 p.m. by Zoom at https://zoom.us/j/735317666

Why do this?: Restoration of the meadows would result in high-quality wet meadow habitat and improvement in habitat connectivity for the federally endangered southern mountain yellow-legged frog, Kern Golden Trout, Pacific Fischer and other amphibians such as toads and tree frogs, which currently occupy the wilderness areas. Meadows are also the source of all the water that flows out of the mountains and to farmlands and cities in the Great Central Valley. 65% of all CA water arises from the Sierra and the meadows in upper montane areas are the source of those waters.

 450 willow saplings need to be planted in Long Meadow while soil moisture is adequate. Please call and help today. 760.447.1702 and info@wildplaces.net

450 willow saplings need to be planted in Long Meadow while soil moisture is adequate. Please call and help today. 760.447.1702 and info@wildplaces.net

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We welcome you to be a part of this project as well as the follow-up event on April 6, "Crossing Barriers to the Environment", a symposium that will more deeply explore the importance of a restoration ethic within our communities, families, and work.

We welcome you to be a part of this project as well as the follow-up event on April 6, "Crossing Barriers to the Environment", a symposium that will more deeply explore the importance of a restoration ethic within our communities, families, and work.