100 Giants Project Presentation at 100% Festival Otis College
Nov
11
3:30 PM15:30

100 Giants Project Presentation at 100% Festival Otis College

  • Occidental College of Art and Design (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Event: Occidental College of Art and Design hosts a presentation/Q&A by WildPlaces on the subject of the 100 Giants Project and the partnership possibilities between Otis students and WildPlaces.

Otis College of Art and Design is celebrating 100 years by hosting a 100% Festival on November 10 and 11, 2018, a dedication to creativity and the 100% commitment artists and designers give to their passion. WildPlaces' Mehmet McMillan will present on Day 2 (November 11th) at 3.30 pm at the Forum- Otis College of Art and Design 9045 Lincoln Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90045 (310) 665.6800.

WildPlaces, a volunteer driven conservation organization that gets kids outside, teaching environmental responsibility, direct place-based action, and mindfulness of our impacts on the planet. WildPlaces will plant the seedlings in the southern Sierra at Trail of 100 Giants in the Giant Sequoia National Monument from where they came and care for the little buggers for two summers.

It seems that WildPlaces and Otis College have crossed paths by way of the very unique and perfect intersectionality discovered between Sheldon (Otis) and Mehmet (WildPlaces), and now a great thing is happening for climate, for 10 generations down, awareness/advocacy, and for volunteers who join the parade…click here to see last year’s success!

Otis Community has germinated and grown 100 Giant Sequoia seedlings from seeds from the Giant Sequoia National Monument and will now hand these trees over to WildPlaces for planting at the Trail of 100 Giants. The seedlings have been raised on campus for a full year.

“Just short of miracle,” says McMillan of WildPlaces, “The truth of the importance of this umbrella species is shown in the hearts and hands of the volunteers involved in their care. “

Bouncing off WildPlaces experience at planting sequoias and mobilizing the messes, the 100 Gianbts Project deeps the program.

Otis College

This presentation at Otis will be followed-up with two or three planting events at the Trail of 100 Giants in the Giant Sequoia National Monument. Volunteers are needed. The ideal volunteer is self-reliant, nature-lover who’s ready to take direct action against the the loss of our wild and natural world. hiking or some backpacking,

This contribution by Otis College and WildPlaces volunteers to the environment will still be growing strong in 2-3,000 years…standing. Combined with its time on the ground, this tree locks carbon up for literally 5-6,000 years. We believe it is never too early or too late to learn that we have the power to make a difference…even now. .

"Re-wilding the future starts with the simple act of planting a seed." - WildPlaces

Date/Time:

November 11 | Sunday| 3:30pm – 4:00pm

Location: The Forum- Otis College of Art and Design 9045 Lincoln Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90045 (310) 665.6800

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Wild and Scenic Film Festival
Nov
9
6:00 PM18:00

Wild and Scenic Film Festival

 

WP-FilmFestival-Poster-01.jpg

Wild and Scenic Rivers are Our Rivers!

Wild and Scenic Film Festival 2018:  

WildPlaces is pleased to host one of the dozens of SYRCL’s Wild and Scenic Film Festival nationwide. We have selected environmental award-winning films to create a series of environmental documentaries focusing on how we the people can and should take personal responsibility for the rivers all over the world and especially those in our back yard in the Sierra Nevada.

Considered one of the nation’s premiere environmental and adventure film festivals, this year’s films will combine stellar filmmaking, beautiful cinematography and first-rate storytelling to inform, inspire and ignite solutions and possibilities to restore the earth and human communities while creating a positive future for the next generation.

“The Wild & Scenic Film Festival is a tremendous way to educate the public about how fragile our earth really is and that caring for it is all our responsibility.”

Festival-goers can expect to see award winning films about nature, community activism, adventure, conservation, water, energy and climate change, wildlife, environmental justice, agriculture, Native American and indigenous cultures.

And WildPlaces is the host in the southern Sierra region. Tickets are now AVAILABLE that showcases about a dozen short films from celebrated producers that celebrate:

·       50th Anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act,

·       The champions of protecting rivers locally and around the world,

·       Every mile of river that doesn’t yet possess protections so that we might rise up and fight to take them back.

·       Inaugurate and open WildPlaces’ satellite office in Fresno’s Bitwise Industries collaborative spaces.

 

 Our goal is to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Wild and Scenic River Act of 1968 while also introducing ourselves to the community, to raise funds for our organization, and to promote our mission of stewardship while preserving and protecting our environment and precious natural resources. Please join us and share your thoughts with our audience as a guest speaker to provide further your valuable insight and knowledge on the importance of rivers and their preservation. Here is a list of the films that will be shown along with a brief synopsis to give you a well-rounded idea of what our event will look like.

A Festival by Activists for Activists

The Wild & Scenic Film Festival is the largest film festival of its kind. We leave you feeling inspired and motivated to make a difference in your community and the world.

What to Expect at the Festival

Experience the adrenaline of kayaking the wildest rivers. Climb the highest peaks. And trek across the globe with adventure films from around the world.

At our festival, you’ll witness how individuals and communities across the globe are taking action.

Tickets are now AVAILABLE at www.wildplaces.net or by calling 559.539.5263 for $25 for individuals and $10 for partner organizations. (No one will be turned away for lack of funds). Evening includes music by Shea Freedom, door prizes, hors d'oeuvres, special Aztec blessing, presentation on the San Joaquin River Gorge and Temperance Dam proposal,  WildPlaces’ membership,  free seedlings, and wine bar.



 

10/24/18

********* Para Publicación Inmediata***********

 

Celebra el ambiente y el 50 Aniversario de la Ley de los Ríos Salvajes y Escénicos asistiendo al Festival de Cine Salvaje y Escénico en Fresno. Celebrado el viernes, 9 de noviembre del 2018 de 6:00p.m a 8:00p.m en el Estadio Sur de Bitwise Industries (700 Van Ness Ave. en Fresno), el Festival de cine de Fresno es organizado por WildPlaces, una organización sin fines de lucro que se centra en la restauración y protección de la tierra y el agua en la Sierra del sur.

 

¡Es considerado uno de los festivales de cine ambiental y de aventura más populares de la nación! El Festival de cine de este año combinará el cine estelar, la cinematografía hermosa y la narrativa de primer nivel para informar, inspirar y fomentar soluciones posibles para restaurar la tierra y las comunidades, a la vez creando un mejor ambiente para generaciones futuras.

 

El Festival de Cine Salvaje y Escénico fue iniciado por el grupo de defensa de la cuenca del río South Yuba (SYRCL) en el 2003. El objetivo del festival es el en celebrar la victoria histórica de SYRCL para recibir el estatus de "Salvaje y Escénico" en 39 millas del río Yuba sur en 1999. UN festival es casa de la ciudad de Nevada e inicia la gira internacional en más de 170 comunidades alrededor del mundo, incluyendo Fresno. El festival está construyendo una red de organizaciones conectadas por un objetivo común, el usar el cine para inspirar el activismo. Con el apoyo de los socios nacionales: Barefoot Wine & Bubbly, CLIF Bar, EarthJustice, Klean Kanteen, Peak Design and Sierra Nevada Brewing Company, el Festival puede llegar a un público aún más grande. El generoso financiamiento de la red Patagonia y Rivers también ayuda a que este evento sea posible.

 

"El Festival de cine Salvaje y Escénico es una manera tremenda de educar al público acerca de lo frágil que es nuestra tierra y que cuidarla es nuestra responsabilidad", dice Theresa Huck de SYRCL.

 

Las personas que asistan al Festival pueden esperar ver películas premiadas sobre la naturaleza, la conservación, la equidad de agua, el activismo comunitario, la aventura, el cambio climático y las culturas nativas americanas e indígenas. los boletos ya están disponibles en www.wildplaces.net o llamando a 559.539.5263 por $25 para individuos y $10 para organizaciones socias. (Nadie será rechazado por falta de fondos). 

Noche incluye música de Shea Freedom, premios sorpresa, entremeses, membresía a WildPlaces, semillas para plantar gratis, y Wine bar.

 

Contacto

Cristel Jensen

303.396.8184

Cristelj29@gmail.com

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River Cleanup - Wild and Scenic Rivers are Our Rivers: A 50th Anniversary Celebration of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act
Oct
20
to Oct 21

River Cleanup - Wild and Scenic Rivers are Our Rivers: A 50th Anniversary Celebration of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act

  • Springville Veterans Memorial Park (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the Wild & Scenic Rivers Act. Groups around the country are celebrating this milestone and looking to the future of our Wild and Scenic Rivers...and WildPlaces joins the party. How? In our traditional fashion of taking action and being the example.

With generous support from Patagonia and Rivers Network, WildPlaces joins this nation-wide celebration by inviting the public to come out to the Tule and help remove the final bits of trash before winter and talk to the people using it about personal responsibility and the Wild and Scenic Act

Why Come?   Because you care about the Tule River. You don't want to see it get trashed, burned, or closed. Maybe you've been going there since you were a kid. Maybe you are a brand new visitor from another state or country. Maybe you are Caucasian, African American, Native American, Latino, Asian, Two-Spirit. Maybe you are Christian, Buddhist, agnostic, Muslim, or atheist.

Any and all of these identities have one thing in common: we all love and need the river, recognize it's importance, and want to act to protect it from harm. That is you, otherwise you wouldn't be receiving this invitation.

So, Just Do It! Join us Saturday and Sunday, October 20-21 from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. for quick walk down The Stairs to share the good word about river stewardship, Wild and Scenic designations, and... yes... pick up a little bit of other people's trash. No regrets. No complaining. It's just what we do...you do. 

Be the change you want the world to be. Please come out , even if it is to pick up one can or to show support to the fine young people who will be doing the heavy lifting. 

It's best to call and register that you are coming at 559.539.5263 or email at info@wildplaces.net. We will meet at the Veterans Memorial Park in Springville at 8 a.m. and caravan or van-pool to the sites. Bring water bottle, hat, sun screen. We will provide the rest, including a simple, nutritouous lunch afterwards. 

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Sep
23
9:00 AM09:00

Rio Limpio: Tule River Stewardship Project and Wild and Scenic Rivers Act 50th Anniversary Celebration

  • Springville Veterans Memorial Park (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

"Volunteers attending Tule River Clean-up on Sept. 23rd to receive free Film Festival tickets"

The Rio Limpio: Tule River Stewardship Project wraps up the 2018 season! Through support from Rivers Network, Patagonia, U.S.F.S., and CA Wildlands Grassroots Fund, six volunteers’ events over four months resulted in trash and gang tagging removal, trail repair, and increased personal responsibility by river recreationists – all delivered by hundreds of statewide and regional volunteers who are concerned about river health and committed to do something about it.

 

A final event will be held on Sept. 23rd from 9 a.m. until 12 noon (with lunch provided 12 noon - 1 p.m.). Volunteers are needed for this final event and celebration of our wild and scenic Tule River. Volunteers meet at the Veterans Memorial Park in Springville at 9 a.m.  

Upon completion, volunteers receive $5 tickets to the upcoming WildPlaces’ Wild and Scenic Film Festival on Nov. 9th to be held at the WildPlaces satellite office in Fresno at Bitwise Industries.

The 2018 summer events and the Sept. 23 Clean-up commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Act (WSR). Passed in 1968, the Act offers protection and acknowledgement to rivers (or sections of rivers) that remain free flowing and possess high quality scenic, wildlife, cultural, and recreation characteristics. The Act protects 12,754 miles of 209 rivers in 40 states, including sections of the Kern River.

Sections of the Tule River qualify for WSR designation as well. With proper understanding of the Act, few can deny its benefit to river health.   It is far better for all that the river remains clean, free flowing, and a scenic highlight that attracts tourist dollars. WildPlaces intents to further explore designation of the Tule River as a WSR and invite public participation in this process.  

The Rio Limpio: Tule River Stewardship program is a watershed-wide community effort of WildPlaces to keep the Tule River safe, clean and open for all to use. WildPlaces is a volunteer-driven organization whose mission is to restore and protect the wild and rural places in the southern Sierra Nevada. Learn more about WildPlaces, volunteering, attending the Wild and Scenic Film Festival, and participating in Wild and Scenic River designation at info@wildplaces.net,    o: (559) 539-5263; c: (760) 447-1702; www.wildplaces.net.

 

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 Trout Meadow Restoration : Fence and Trail Repair (2 of 2)
Aug
18
to Sep 25

Trout Meadow Restoration : Fence and Trail Repair (2 of 2)

  • Golden Trout Wilderness (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Trout Meadow Restoration: Fence and Trail Repair Project 2018

Saturday, July 14th until Saturday, July 21st

and

Saturday, August 18th until Saturday, August 25th

Caravan will depart from WildPlaces' Headquarters in Springville at   9 a.m. to Lewis Camp Trailhead.  Departure from Lewis Camp Trailhead is at 10 a.m. July 14th and return Saturday July 21st.  

·       (Departure and return dates subject to change. Check in for updates at 760.447.1702 and at www.wildplaces.net). 

·       Pre-event meeting is mandatory and is held Saturday, July 7th all day. Registration is required. Registration material available by calling 559.539.5263 or info@wildplaces.net.

 

·       Location: Golden Trout Wilderness, Sequoia National Forest

·       Elevation 6160’

·       Coordinates:

th.jpg

·       Background: The US Congress designated the Golden Trout Wilderness in 1978 and is now 303,770 aces, all located in California and managed by Sequoia and Inyo National Forests. It is bordered by the John Muir Wilderness to northeast and Sequoia-Kings Canyon to the north, the South Sierra Wilderness to northeast. The brightly colored California state fish, the golden trout, live in the waters of Golden Trout Wilderness, and are a species of special concern due to impacts mainly from cattle grazing and climate change. A large drainage basin surrounded by high, jagged peaks dominates the western portion of the Wilderness in Sequoia National Forest. The eastern portion in Inyo National Forest is primarily an extension of the Kern Plateau. Pinion-pine woodlands rise to extensive Jeffrey pine forestland and meadows at middle elevations, and on to red fir, lodgepole pines, and foxtail pines at higher elevations before hitting the tree line. Two Wild and Scenic Rivers, the North and South Forks of the Kern River, flow across the area. The North Fork rages through stunningly beautiful country and offers one of America's premier multiday white-water adventures, a challenge for the most expert rafter. Summer thunderstorms are common, but water may be scarce away from the rivers during dry spells. Several hundred miles of exceptionally scenic backpacking and horsepacking trails traverse the area. Popular trails include a forty-mile section of the Pacific Crest Trail, and the Cottonwood Pass Trail, which crosses the Sierra and drops into the Kern River Canyon about 16 miles to the west.

·       The Ecology: Mountain meadows are often overlooked as dormant space between the prized high peaks and roaring rivers, when in fact meadows are keystone to the mountain ecosystems and to the watershed as a whole. The ecological and hydrologic role that mountain meadows play has been largely overlooked by scientists and land managers and therefore has largely remained an unknown resource.

·       The Problem: Historic and current land and water use practices have impacted Sierra Mountain Meadows ecosystems and Trout Meadow is no exception. The major human activities that have negative impacts affected the health of mountain meadows began with domestic livestock grazing by the Spaniards beginning in the 17th century. This was soon followed by mining practices during the gold rush in the mid-nineteenth century and associated acceleration of logging practices. Many of the very destructive methods used in the nineteenth century were stopped or vastly improved during the 20th century; however the legacy of misuse remains a reality

·       Project Description: Project Description: Construct cattle exclusion fencing around Trout Meadow to keep range cattle from entering the meadow. In addition, years of debris left by recreationist will be removed from the site

·       Who: WildPlaces and Backcountry Horsemen Association. The Backcountry Horsemen Association has for many years worked to address these issues and our local Sequoia-area BCHA deserves great appreciation for their longtime stewardship. BCHA has invited WildPlaces to help on this project. The collaboration between an environmental organization and stockmen will lead to strong understanding and common ground where historical ideological impasses have kept the two as adversary wherein this project will help broaden the base of support for land stewardship and protection.

·       Difficulty: This is a difficult project and volunteers need to have physical stamina, backpacking skills, labor skills and a strong commitment to safety.

·   Leave No Trace Principles must be adhered to. No exceptions.

·       Compensation: Experienced backpackers and those with Wilderness skills can expect $50/day compensation. Beginners will not receive stipends on this first trip but will qualify for stipends on the second trip (8/18-25/18). Gaining experience is required before getting paid. This trip offers valuable and useful training in backpacking, stock animals, habitat restoration, orienteering, and risk management.

Pre-event meeting is mandatory and is help Saturday, July 7th all day.

 

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Rio Limpio: Tule River Stewardship and Trash Removal and 50th Anniversary of Wild and Scenic Rivers
Jul
22
8:00 AM08:00

Rio Limpio: Tule River Stewardship and Trash Removal and 50th Anniversary of Wild and Scenic Rivers

You care about the Tule River. You don't want to see it get trashed, burned, or closed. Maybe you've been going there since you were a kid. Maybe you are a brand new visitor from another state or country. Maybe you are Caucasian, African American, Native American, Latino, Asian, Two-Spirit. Maybe you are Christian, Buddhist, Muslim, or atheist.

Any and all of these identities have one thing in common: we all love the river, recognize it's importance, and want to act to protect it from harm. That is you, otherwise you wouldn't be receiving this invitation. Also

Also, 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the Wild & Scenic Rivers Act. Groups around the country are celebrating this milestone and looking to the future of our Wild and Scenic Rivers...and WildPlaces joins the party.

With generous support from Patagonia and Rivers Network, WildPlaces joins this effort at this event plus on Sept 1, 2018 on the Tule for the "Wild and Scenic Rivers are Our Rivers" event. 

Join us Sunday, July 22 from 8 a.m. until 11 a.m. for quick walk down The Stairs to share the good word about river stewardship and, yes, pick up a little bit of other people's trash. No regrets. No complaining. It's just what we do...you do. 

Be the change you want the world to be. Please come out , even if it is to pick up one can or to show support to the fine young people who will be doing the heavy lifting. 

It's best to call and register that you are coming at 559.539.5263 or email at info@wildplaces.net. We will meet at WildPlaces Headquarters at 8 a.m. and caravan or van-pool to the sites. Bring water bottle, hat, sun screen. We will provide the rest, including a simple, nutritouous lunch afterwards. 

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Trout Meadow Restoration : Fence and Trail Repair (1 of 2)
Jul
14
to Jul 21

Trout Meadow Restoration : Fence and Trail Repair (1 of 2)

  • Golden Trout Wilderness (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Trout Meadow Restoration: Fence and Trail Repair Project 2018

Saturday, July 14th until Saturday, July 21st

and

Saturday, August 18th until Saturday, August 25th

Caravan will depart from WildPlaces' Headquarters in Springville at   9 a.m. to Lewis Camp Trailhead.  Departure from Lewis Camp Trailhead is at 10 a.m. July 14th and return Saturday July 21st.  

·       (Departure and return dates subject to change. Check in for updates at 760.447.1702 and at www.wildplaces.net). 

·       Pre-event meeting is mandatory and is held Saturday, July 7th all day. Registration is required. Registration material available by calling 559.539.5263 or info@wildplaces.net.

 

·       Location: Golden Trout Wilderness, Sequoia National Forest

·       Elevation 6160’

·       Coordinates:

th.jpg

·       Background: The US Congress designated the Golden Trout Wilderness in 1978 and is now 303,770 aces, all located in California and managed by Sequoia and Inyo National Forests. It is bordered by the John Muir Wilderness to northeast and Sequoia-Kings Canyon to the north, the South Sierra Wilderness to northeast. The brightly colored California state fish, the golden trout, live in the waters of Golden Trout Wilderness, and are a species of special concern due to impacts mainly from cattle grazing and climate change. A large drainage basin surrounded by high, jagged peaks dominates the western portion of the Wilderness in Sequoia National Forest. The eastern portion in Inyo National Forest is primarily an extension of the Kern Plateau. Pinion-pine woodlands rise to extensive Jeffrey pine forestland and meadows at middle elevations, and on to red fir, lodgepole pines, and foxtail pines at higher elevations before hitting the tree line. Two Wild and Scenic Rivers, the North and South Forks of the Kern River, flow across the area. The North Fork rages through stunningly beautiful country and offers one of America's premier multiday white-water adventures, a challenge for the most expert rafter. Summer thunderstorms are common, but water may be scarce away from the rivers during dry spells. Several hundred miles of exceptionally scenic backpacking and horsepacking trails traverse the area. Popular trails include a forty-mile section of the Pacific Crest Trail, and the Cottonwood Pass Trail, which crosses the Sierra and drops into the Kern River Canyon about 16 miles to the west.

·       The Ecology: Mountain meadows are often overlooked as dormant space between the prized high peaks and roaring rivers, when in fact meadows are keystone to the mountain ecosystems and to the watershed as a whole. The ecological and hydrologic role that mountain meadows play has been largely overlooked by scientists and land managers and therefore has largely remained an unknown resource.

·       The Problem: Historic and current land and water use practices have impacted Sierra Mountain Meadows ecosystems and Trout Meadow is no exception. The major human activities that have negative impacts affected the health of mountain meadows began with domestic livestock grazing by the Spaniards beginning in the 17th century. This was soon followed by mining practices during the gold rush in the mid-nineteenth century and associated acceleration of logging practices. Many of the very destructive methods used in the nineteenth century were stopped or vastly improved during the 20th century; however the legacy of misuse remains a reality

·       Project Description: Project Description: Construct cattle exclusion fencing around Trout Meadow to keep range cattle from entering the meadow. In addition, years of debris left by recreationist will be removed from the site

·       Who: WildPlaces and Backcountry Horsemen Association. The Backcountry Horsemen Association has for many years worked to address these issues and our local Sequoia-area BCHA deserves great appreciation for their longtime stewardship. BCHA has invited WildPlaces to help on this project. The collaboration between an environmental organization and stockmen will lead to strong understanding and common ground where historical ideological impasses have kept the two as adversary wherein this project will help broaden the base of support for land stewardship and protection.

·       Difficulty: This is a difficult project and volunteers need to have physical stamina, backpacking skills, labor skills and a strong commitment to safety.

·   Leave No Trace Principles must be adhered to. No exceptions.

·       Compensation: Experienced backpackers and those with Wilderness skills can expect $50/day compensation. Beginners will not receive stipends on this first trip but will qualify for stipends on the second trip (8/18-25/18). Gaining experience is required before getting paid. This trip offers valuable and useful training in backpacking, stock animals, habitat restoration, orienteering, and risk management.

Pre-event meeting is mandatory and is help Saturday, July 7th all day.

 

1571_thumbnail-1024.jpg
map_jerkey-kernlk.jpg
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Wilderness Ranger Academy
Jun
4
to Jun 8

Wilderness Ranger Academy

  • san bernandino national forest (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Mark your calendars!  We are delighted to announce that the 2018 Interagency Wilderness Ranger Academy will be hosted by the San Bernardino National Forest, June 4-8, 2018!  Please save the date and share this announcement with your local wilderness stewardship partners. 

 

The purpose to the Academy is to provide field level wilderness rangers, partners and volunteers a “tool box” of professional wilderness management skills.  All levels of experience are welcome.  Concurrent sessions will be offered to accommodate first-year field rangers as well as returning rangers.  As in past years, the training is available to agency employees, partners and volunteers at no charge and free camping will be available to attendees to help keep costs down.  There will be great opportunities to hear engaging speakers, learn new skills, practice wilderness visitor contact and LNT techniques, receive certifications and network with peers from around California!  This year we also have the unique opportunity to host two international guests who steward protected areas in Germany!

 

Additional details, an agenda and registration information will be sent out in the next few months but we wanted to get this on your calendars for planning purposes.

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WildLeaders Field Training at Monache Intertribal Gathering
May
19
to May 20

WildLeaders Field Training at Monache Intertribal Gathering

  • 132 Rio Del Loma, Kernville, CA 93238 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Our training will be held in conjunction with the Monache Intertribal Gathering so that we can build stronger relations with our Native families  and to recruit volunteers and leaders for the summer program.

WildLeaders Training is an introduction to important aspects and planning of WildPlaces' volunteer events--events often lead and planned by volunteers just like you. Events like ours, often held in remote locations, offer unique challenges where communication, leadership, and emergency response must be taken seriously and prepared for in such ways that risks are reduced or, if incurred, that volunteers and staff are in step together with the proper response.  Participants will begin to bond, train together, and will have basic tools at hand to manage risk, respond to emergencies, and keep team dynamics stron

It is also an opportunity to see and sign up for restoration projects that WildPlaces will conduct this coming season that include bare-root tree planting, trail construction, river water quality monitoring, meadow restoration, and trash and tagging removal on the river

Camping is free at Campo 4 / Bone Creek and the training will be held at Camp 4/Bone Creek in  

Check in with Mehmet@wildplaces.net and 760.447.1702 if you are interested in attending WildLeaders at Monache Gathering.

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Rio Limpio: Kern River Clean-Up @ Remington Hot Springs
May
13
9:00 AM09:00

Rio Limpio: Kern River Clean-Up @ Remington Hot Springs

In need of Volunteers to help with the efforts of trail maintenance, tub scrubbing & trash pick up! Remington Hot Springs are natural tubs rich with minerals such as Zinc, Copper, Sulfur & Magnesium with temperatures varying 90-105 degrees, along with a beautiful scenic river view. With recent popularity of the Great Outdoors increasing the human foot print is significantly visible & brings attention to the lack of concern & moral ethics towards our Mother Earth. So, why not be apart of a monthly initiative ensuring continued access & enjoyment of the gorgeous Remington Hot Springs along the Kern River. Bring swim gear to soak & relax after maintenance & duties are completed. Limited transportation available from Bakersfield College. Please wear close-toed shoes & hat. Bring water & snacks/lunch. For more information & registration contact River with WildPlaces at River@wildplaces.net or by phone (661)717-2715 

RemmingtonHotSprings.jpg
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Trail of 100 Giants Trail Repair
May
12
10:00 AM10:00

Trail of 100 Giants Trail Repair

Trail of 100 Giants Trail Repair

  • Saturday, May 12, 2018
  • 10:00 AM 6:00 PM  

Join us on this one day trail repair and rebuild event as we make the iconic Trail of 100 Giants more accessible, ecologically more sound,  and safer to visitors and friends from around the world. There's something for every age, gender,  and ability...and there is free lunch!

Join WildPlaces and the Sequoia Roots Corp at the Trail of 100 Giants Trail Maintenance Day! Help protect the Giant Sequoia National Monument as attempts to dismantle it by logging interests are happening RIGHT NOW! By taking direct action to improve the trail, you will be showing the world that you care and want to keep all protections of the Monument intact.

Of course the restoration aspect hinges on a broader topic: We are showing the misinformed and greedy (aka. Trumpster administration and local policy wonks) as well as the entire world that dismantling and selling off Mother Nature will not pass. Large, connected habitat is essential for human and non-human survival and logging is absolutely not going to ensure connectivity nor is it going protect us from wildfires! 

Our trail maintenance and meadow restoration projects are on-going in the GSNM where people give their time and money to ensure solid protection. We will show resistance-through-stewardship to bad decisions  through the direct action of boots on the group.

 Trail maintenance work will occur at the Trail of 100 Giants and consist of creating "switch backs", clearing debris, revegetating open spaces, removing noxious plants, and conducting public outreach. Tasks are easy to moderately difficult.

How to Get There:

A van will be leaving 37608 Rio Vista in Springville Ca. We have room for 13.

(PDF Map)You can reach Long Meadow Grove from the San Joaquin Valley Highway 99 by taking State Highway 65 to County Route SM56 east about 20 miles to California Hot Springs. At California Hot Springs continue north and east on County Route SM50 (Parker Pass Road). This highway winds up into the mountains and intersects Western Divide Highway about 2 miles east of Parker Pass Turn left on SM99 to Trail of 100 Giants and Redwood Meadow Campground. Coming out of the Kern Valley, take Mountain 99 (County Route SM99) up the "Upper Kern" river about 20 miles to County Route SM50 near Johnsondale. Stay on SM99 for about 5.5 miles west of Johnsondale is the junction with Western Divide Highway (County Route SM107) near Parker Pass (right). Take Western Divide Highway about 2.0 miles to Redwood Meadow Campground and Trail of 100 Giants.

Accessibility:

This gentle trail (6% maximum grade) is paved and suitable for wheel chairs.

                                                               What to Bring:

Close-toed sturdy boots, long pants, hat , sun screen, gloves, picnic lunch, binoculars, plenty of drinking water, cameras/video, costumes, and bikes.


                                                              General Notes:

Nearby Campgrounds: Redwood Meadow Campground (GPS NAD 83: 35.97778, -118.59167)

Elevation: 6,400 feet
Difficulty (hiking):  Easy - 30 minutes
Facilities: Available at Redwood Meadow Campground

Adequate interpretive signs are found throughout. Hiking along the trail through the grove, you'll find mainly old sequoias and many, many felled trees due to beetle infestation. You will view a unique cedar and sequoia tree growing together, and a circle of five sequoias growing together. At each and every turn there are wonders to behold! But don't be discouraged by the condition of much of the groove due to recent haward tree removal. The Trail of 100 Giants looks severally impacted from drought and beetle effecting the associate forest species. 

Weather and Appropriate Gear

 Dry conditions require plenty of hydration (at least one gallon per day). Wear layered clothes, close-toed shoes, long pants, sun protection, and personal water bottle.

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Two-Spirit Gathering Springville, CA
Apr
13
to Apr 15

Two-Spirit Gathering Springville, CA

  • Springville, CA, 93265 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Two Spirit (also two-spirit or twospirit) is a modern term used to describe certain spiritual people who may also be gay, lesbian, bisexual, and gender-variant. 

"Two Spirit" is not interchangeable with most words currently used in western culture such as LGBTQ, Queer, Gay, etc.  This title differs from most western, mainstream definitions of sexuality and gender identity in that it is not so much about whom one sleeps with, or how one personally identifies; rather, it is a sacred, spiritual and ceremonial role that is recognized and confirmed by the Elders of the Two Spirit's ceremonial community.

The second annual Gathering of Two Spirit People is being organized now to be held on the Tule River in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California within the Giant Sequoia National Monument to be held April 13-16th, 2018. 

Registration is required for this free event. Upon registration, you will be directed to receive, review, and complete (where requested) the following:

1. Liability Waiver and Meidical History are required. Complete and return by email or bring it along when you come.

2. Guidelines for the Land upon which the event is held.

3. Personal/Suggested Gear List

4.Map Directions

5. FAQ

The Land is  12 acres of fotthill Blus Oak woodland habitat and located on both sides of the Tule River at about 1,200 feet in the Blue Oak Woodland foothills in the southern Sierra Nevada within the Sequoia National Forest/Giant Sequoia Natioanl Monument. The people who live, work, and play  there are the stewards and do their best to protect and enhance (when possible) the natural qualities of this land. It is an amazing privately-owned sanctuary and ceremonial place that includes MEXICA Temazcalli , Danza circle, community leaders training, land and water restoration and stewardship, and camping for those who agree with its philosophy and vision.

The Two-Spirit Gathering will include:
• Temazcalli (or Mexicasweat) Lodge
• Native dancing such as Danza Azteca
• Facilitated Talking Circles
• Habitat restoration and stewardship project (Giant Sequoia seedling planting) on Sunday morning, 3/15th.
• Sacred Alter  

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Crossing Barriers to the Environment Symposium
Apr
6
9:30 PM21:30

Crossing Barriers to the Environment Symposium

This first annual symposium:

1) Starts with the stories of you – what you as individuals, organizations, classrooms, and families experienced in outdoor activities …with or without WildPlaces as your guide.

2) Takes these experiences collectively to create a blueprint for communities to engage in public lands both as visitor and change agent; and finally,

3) Identify solutions to overcome the barriers preventing many in Central Valley communities from accessing National Parks, National Forests, National Monuments, or any open natural space.   

The interactive discussions will cover updates on adapting to drought and climate, strengthening public land management policy, and identify how the loss of the connection with Nature is seen within communities. Hopefully, a balance of attendees will hold space for both those steeped in the experience of the wild and those who haven’t yet introduced themselves to the southern Sierra Nevada, our closest mountain neighbor.

 Thank you for consideration of this free event. Please RSVP soon. Questions? info@wildplaces.net and 559.539.5263.

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Giant Sequoia National Monument Free Public Tour and Public Lands Workshop
Feb
24
10:00 AM10:00

Giant Sequoia National Monument Free Public Tour and Public Lands Workshop

Join us on February  from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. or on any of the free monthly Monument tours hosted by WildPlaces and made possible through the charitable contributions of California Wildlands Rapid Response Grant and Lush Charitable Giving Program.

Come live the stories you've been told and see for yourself snowy high Sierra meadows, touch wild and scenic rivers, plant Giant sequoia seedlings, explore waterfalls, learn locations of secret recreation areas. This is a unique opportunity, to say the least.

Register by emailing info@wildplaces.net and calling 760.447.1702. Only 10 spaces available    

This and all scheduled tours are free and  include transportation, lunch, and  an "in-flight" public lands workshop designed to educate us on the many critical functions that public lands provide.

Adaptation of Plants, Animals and Humans to Wildfires:  What to Expect Following the Pier Fire! with Dr. Jon Keeley, fire ecologist/research scientist for the United States Geological Survey and adjunct professor UCLA! !

Wildfires are a necessary part of the ecology of many wild landscapes in mediterranean-type climates across the globe, promoting healthy wildlands and biodiversity. After an explosive fire year in California, many questions arise as humans more commonly move into areas that are subject to burning.  Dr. Keeley will provide an overview of the fire history of Sierra Nevada forests and shrublands, describing interesting ways plants and animals have adapted to survive wildfires. This talk will touch on important issues related to the wildland-urban interface, as well as the future in an era of global change.!

Lunch is provided

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Pier Fire 2017

WildPlace's Headquarters

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PCL’s 2018 California Environmental Assembly
Feb
24
8:00 AM08:00

PCL’s 2018 California Environmental Assembly

Each year PCL focuses on policy topics that are relevant and current in California’s environmental policy. We are planning to do so again this year with several important policy sessions as well as legal environmental issues and current court cases to watch.

Given the strong interest from last year’s assembly on diversity and the shared values, we all work so hard to protect and promote across California, we will be adding a topic track devoted entirely to the intersectionality of our shared values and organizational collaboration and co-advocacy strategies.

Additionally, we will add a job and internship fair for youth and new activists to learn about policy work, as well as encourage them to build a career in the field and develop the job skills to do so.  Empowering the younger generations to continue the work ahead is critical to all of us. We are offering full scholarships for students – click here to download the application (pdf).

Join the Planning and Conservation League on February 24, 2018, at McGeorge School of Law for the annual California Environmental Assembly. Tickets are on sale now – click here to purchase yours.

What:  Planning and Conservation League’s 2018 California Environmental Assembly

When:  Saturday, February 24, 2018, registration and breakfast starts at 7:30 am

Where:  McGeorge School 3200 5th Ave, Sacramento, CA 95817

Who:  Leading local and state elected officials, agency representatives, nonprofit and community leaders, attorneys, planners, and business representatives

Get on the list: Email Us

Download the Assembly Flyer

Speakers & Special Guests
Invited – Speakers

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra
Mayor Jose Gurrola, City of Arvin
Mayor Michael Tubbs, City of Stockton

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Trail of 100 Giants Trail Repair
Feb
11
10:00 AM10:00

Trail of 100 Giants Trail Repair

 

Join us on this one day trail repair and rebuild event as we make the iconic Trail of 100 Giants more accessible, ecologically more sound,  and safer to visitors and friends from around the world. There's something for every age, gender,  and ability...and there is free lunch!

Join WildPlaces and the Sequoia Roots Corp at the Trail of 100 Giants Trail Maintenance Day! Help protect the Giant Sequoia National Monument as attempts to dismantle it by logging interests are happening RIGHT NOW! By taking direct action to improve the trail, you will be showing the world that you care and want to keep all protections of the Monument intact.

Of course the restoration aspect hinges on a broader topic: We are showing the misinformed and greedy (aka. Trumpster administration and local policy wonks) as well as the entire world that dismantling and selling off Mother Nature will not pass. Large, connected habitat is essential for human and non-human survival and logging is absolutely not going to ensure connectivity nor is it going protect us from wildfires! 

Our trail maintenance and meadow restoration projects are on-going in the GSNM where people give their time and money to ensure solid protection. We will show resistance-through-stewardship to bad decisions  through the direct action of boots on the group.

 Trail maintenance work will occur at the Trail of 100 Giants and consist of creating "switch backs", clearing debris, revegetating open spaces, removing noxious plants, and conducting public outreach. Tasks are easy to moderately difficult.

How to Get There:

A van will be leaving 37608 Rio Vista in Springville Ca. We have room for 13.

(PDF Map)You can reach Long Meadow Grove from the San Joaquin Valley Highway 99 by taking State Highway 65 to County Route SM56 east about 20 miles to California Hot Springs. At California Hot Springs continue north and east on County Route SM50 (Parker Pass Road). This highway winds up into the mountains and intersects Western Divide Highway about 2 miles east of Parker Pass Turn left on SM99 to Trail of 100 Giants and Redwood Meadow Campground. Coming out of the Kern Valley, take Mountain 99 (County Route SM99) up the "Upper Kern" river about 20 miles to County Route SM50 near Johnsondale. Stay on SM99 for about 5.5 miles west of Johnsondale is the junction with Western Divide Highway (County Route SM107) near Parker Pass (right). Take Western Divide Highway about 2.0 miles to Redwood Meadow Campground and Trail of 100 Giants.

Accessibility:

This gentle trail (6% maximum grade) is paved and suitable for wheel chairs.

                                                               What to Bring:

Close-toed sturdy boots, long pants, hat , sun screen, gloves, picnic lunch, binoculars, plenty of drinking water, cameras/video, costumes, and bikes.


                                                              General Notes:

Nearby Campgrounds: Redwood Meadow Campground (GPS NAD 83: 35.97778, -118.59167)

Elevation: 6,400 feet
Difficulty (hiking):  Easy - 30 minutes
Facilities: Available at Redwood Meadow Campground

Adequate interpretive signs are found throughout. Hiking along the trail through the grove, you'll find mainly old sequoias and many, many felled trees due to beetle infestation. You will view a unique cedar and sequoia tree growing together, and a circle of five sequoias growing together. At each and every turn there are wonders to behold! But don't be discouraged by the condition of much of the groove due to recent haward tree removal. The Trail of 100 Giants looks severally impacted from drought and beetle effecting the associate forest species. 

Weather and Appropriate Gear

 Dry conditions require plenty of hydration (at least one gallon per day). Wear layered clothes, close-toed shoes, long pants, sun protection, and personal water bottle.

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Feb
10
10:30 AM10:30

Tulare County Office of Education Volunteer Days

For high school & middle school students  

Improve wildlife habitat conditions of the Circle J pond & stream areas.
 
Work alongside professionals and learn the science behind the projects. 
 
Get involved in ecological habitat restoration at Circle J Ranch!

Contact Nancy Bruce, Lead Teacher @  (559) 539-2263 or

Josh Moore @ WIldPlaces @ (559) 303 - 4409

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Jan
1
10:00 AM10:00

Native Plant Nursery Day Every Monday

  • 32588 California 190 Springville, CA, 93265 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

It's that time of the year when willow cuttings, oak acorns and other Native plants must be propagated for next season's habitat restoration projects and free giveaways to members..

Volunteers are needed at the  USFS/WildPlaces Nursery in Springville for two easy hours of weeding, planting, and other stuffprojects to maintain and repair the nursery, plant oak acorns, Giant sequoia seedlings, and willow cuttings for next season's restoration projects.  

Meadows are the most important feature of the watershed, directly impacting the quality and quantity of water going to downstream habitat, cities, economy, agriculture, or remaining banked as snow.

 

 Reach Josh at josh@wildplaces.net and 559.303.4409  if you can join. Volunteers will meet at the nursery located at the USFS Work Station in Spirngville (see map).

 

 

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New Year's Eve Sweat
Dec
31
to Jan 1

New Year's Eve Sweat

  • 37608 Mountain Road 189 Springville, CA, 93265 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Right in Springville, there is a sweat lodge located on the Tule River. WildPlaces is honored to have use of it and have invited a limited number of folks to join the "Come One, Come All 2018 New Year's Sweat and Ceremony.

 Bring in the new year with this traditional (or for some,  nontraditional) way to greet the rest of your life. Beginning at 11 p.m. 12/31/17and ending 12;30 a.m. on 1/1/18, this event is very specific to all those who come with reverence for nature in their heart and the understanding that all of Nature is a ceremony given to us freely by the Madre Tierra.

This is a no alcohol event and potluck. Hydration prior to and after the sweat is essential and anyone for any reason can be asked not to participate by the sweat facilitators. Bring towel, water bottle, light clothing for sweat and warm clothing for after. More details by calling Mehmet at 760.447.1702. This is an invitation only event.

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Rio Limpio Event Offered as Gift to Nature
Dec
25
10:00 AM10:00

Rio Limpio Event Offered as Gift to Nature

  • springville veterans memorial park (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Give Mother Nature a gift on Christmas Day and help keep trash out of the Tule River-- give  the gift of stewardship, then join for food and a sit in the Hot Tub afterwards in Camp Nelson. This is a family friendly event and folks are invited to sign up by contacting us at 559.539.5263. Space is limited and only 5 spots are left. (Yes, you can buy yourself into a spot.).

We will clean up the road from the Stairs to Camp Nelson...or some place near Camp Nelson. 

Interested? Register first at 559.539.5263 and then meet at Springville Veterans Park at          10 a.m,  on Christmas Day. This is a perfect easy-walking activity before you load up on Christmas calories. 

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Winter Solstice Bonfire, Potluck, and Drumming
Dec
21
5:00 PM17:00

Winter Solstice Bonfire, Potluck, and Drumming

  • 37608 Mountain Road 189 Springville, CA, 93265 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The short day is coming and with it,  the beginning of a new cycle - seasons set forth on their march marking time and progress in our lives. Come celebrate with us. Bring something to share, a drum or any instrument, spoken word, and the best hat that you've got. Make it a warm one because it'll be cold, except around our fire.

Requires RSVP to Mehmet@wildplaces.net or 760.447.1702. 

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Native Plant Nursery Day
Dec
18
10:00 AM10:00

Native Plant Nursery Day

  • 32588 California 190 Springville, CA, 93265 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

It's that time of the year when willow cuttings, oak acorns and other Native plants must be propagated for next season's habitat restoration plantings and free giveaways to members..

Volunteers are needed at the  USFS/WildPlaces Nursery in Springville in these short and easy projects to maintain and repair the nursery, plant oak acorns, Giant sequoia seedlings, and willow cuttings for next season's restoration projects.  

Meadows are the most important feature of the watershed, directly impacting the quality and quantity of water going to downstream habitat, cities, economy, agriculture, or remaining banked as snow.

In other words,  healthy meadows = clean and abundant water...however, most meadowsin the Sierra are impaired mostly due to more than 100 years of cattle grazing combined with climate change and urban expansion. Restoring meadows is of paramount importance to all of California and planting willow cuttings into pots and growing them for six months in the nursery is a critical component to the restoration. The same can be said for oak woodland habitat. Poor urban development is fragmenting and concreting over oak woodland habitat. Think "Walmart parking lot..." 

 Reach Josh at josh@wildplaces.net and 559.303.4409  if you can join. Volunteers will meet at the nursery located at the USFS Work Station in Spirngville (see map).

 

 

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Rally/Road Trip to Bears Ears National Monument
Dec
1
to Dec 5

Rally/Road Trip to Bears Ears National Monument

Trump announced he is going to Utah in December 4th. His stated intent is to eliminate vast portions of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments. He may also act to reduce other monuments around the country at that time.
This action is illegal, unwarranted, and dismisses the more than 2.8 million people that petitioned President Trump to keep our national monuments fully intact. It is also an affront to Native American Tribes.
WildPlaces joins Utahns on December 2nd to resist Trump’s efforts to dismantle our national monuments. Let’s send a clear and visible message that we intend to “Honor Tribes” and defend the priceless scientific, cultural, and ecological legacies these monuments represent.
Bring your #SaveGrandStaircase and #StandWithBearsEars signs and wear your “Protect Bears Ears” and “I Stand with Grand Staircase-Escalante” t-shirts. If you don’t have signs, pick them up at Wasatch Touring (700 E 100 S), at the event, or make your own. T-shirts are sold at Wasatch Touring and at the event.
The rally will occur inside the State Capitol Rotunda.
WildPlaces will transport volunteers from Springville and Porterville on 12/1 at 6 p.m. and return Tuesday 12/6
Questions and to join the road trip, reach Raul Garcia at WildPlaces: (559) 568-8557; raul@wildplaces.net
***There will also be a Street Protest when Trump is actually in Utah which we will attend

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Long Meadow Restoration: Willow Propagation
Nov
4
9:00 AM09:00

Long Meadow Restoration: Willow Propagation

What: The Forest Service proposes to restore 10 meadows in the Sequoia Prioritized Ten Meadows Restoration Project (Ten Meadows Project) located in two areas on the Giant Sequoia National Forest and Sequoia National Forest.  This watershed improvement project across ten meadows in the headwaters of the North and South Forks of the Kern River proposes to improve the resiliency of montane meadows and channel ecosystems and watershed hydrologic processes. This weekend we will be clipping willow branches to be taken care of in our WildPlaces Nursery in Springville CA. We will then continue caring for these little guys as part of the Ten Meadows Restoration Project.

Who: WildPlaces volunteers are needed on this project date to begin the vegetation propagation phase; that is, take willow cuttings from existing willow trees in Long Meadow and propagating those cutting in pots in the WildPlaces' nursery in Springville

When: Volunteers will meet at the WildPlaces Springville Headquarters on Saturday November 4th at 9 a.m. and ride the WildPlaces van, returning at approximately 2 p.m. Bring close-toed sturdy shoes, layered warm clothing, rain jacket, water bottle, sack lunch, hat, sunscreen. We will provide tools, gloves, transportation, and demonstration on taking the cuttings.

Why: Restoration of the meadows would result in high-quality wet meadow habitat and improvement in habitat connectivity for the federally endangered southern mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa), Kern Golden Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss aguabonita) and other amphibians such as toads and tree frogs, which currently occupy the wilderness areas. Meadows are also the source of all the water that flows out of the mountains and to farmlands and cities in the Great Central Valley. 65% of all CA water arises from the Sierra and the meadows in upper montane areas are the source of those waters.

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